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Movies Reviews Spider-Man

Retro Sci-Fi Review: Spider-Man (2002)

Directed by Sam Raimi. Written by David Koepp. Starring Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, Willem Dafoe, and James Franco.

The Spring of Sci-Fi Review #11

Before this blog became The Number One Archives, it used to run under a different name. It used to be just me working alone on this blog. Occasionally, I will scroll through older posts that I did in the past. I noticed that there were a series of posts that I never finished. Today, I will finish the posts. The posts were about Sam Raimi’s superhero classic, Spider-Man (2002). After looking back, the posts were me giving summaries of the film while intoxicated. I remember that I was trying to have a movie marathon of the Holy Trilogy (original Spider-Man trilogy) two years ago. I watched the first two Spider-Man films, then I got sleepy so I never watched the third. I still plan on revisiting the third soon. Let’s talk about the first film.

If you haven’t seen the first film by now, shame on you. I will let younger audiences have a pass. They were probably raised in the Andrew Garfield/Tom Holland era more than likely. Tobey Maguire stars as Peter Parker, who is a high school student that gets bitten by a radioactive spider. The bite gifts Parker with powers, such as webbing, enhanced strength, enhanced agility, and spider-sense. After the murder of his beloved Uncle Ben, Parker adopts the moniker of Spider-Man and begins to fight the crime that took away his uncle. Spider-Man will get put to the test as the villain Green Goblin (Willem Dafoe) rises to prominence with a pure hatred for the hero. Spider-Man will have to risk his life to protect those he loves from the grasp of the Goblin’s fingertips.

Sam Raimi does an amazing job of capturing the essence of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko’s work on Amazing Spider-Man. In the film, Peter Parker is a person that we all can relate to. He’s in high school with a few friends and a few bullies. Rosemary Harris (Aunt May) and Cliff Robertson (Uncle Ben) did a fantastic job of recreating that loving environment that Peter Parker had in the comics. Tobey Maguire’s charm that he has helps us to connect with the character and portray to us why the movie characters want to support Parker. He’s a good kid, who has these awful struggles.

The special effects are still great, though a few are starting to look dated. A majority of these effects are still fantastic because Raimi would use practical effects when he had the chance. Spider-Man’s web-slinging through New York still has that fluidity and acrobatic movement that is to admire. The fight scenes are brutal to this day, especially the final fight between Spider-Man and Green Goblin. Raimi manages to get violent as possible while being able to maintain the film’s PG-13 rating. All of the fight scenes are full of emotion as both hero and villain know each other personally.

Raimi does well blending the genres of science fiction and horror together. We get the science of Parker transforming into a hero to Norman Osborn/Green Goblin morphing into a super villain. In these transformation scenes, we get a sense of terror from Raimi’s direction. A prime example is the scene where Norman Osborn injects himself with drugs that make him into a super human. Dafoe goes absolutely absurd with his eyes rolled up in his head during the scene. It’s exciting, yet terrifying. A scene that will stick with you.

Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man is a classic that’s still memorable in millions of minds across the world. It showed that Marvel could be a heavy hitter like they are now in cinema. The world was taken by storm in 2002 when this movie released. It now has inspired several Spider-Man films to follow its path. Be warned…this film induces the drug known as nostalgia.

Overall rating: 4/5.

By Jordan Lash

My name is Jordan Lash. I write about gaming and comics.

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